Eric Berry: What He Brings To The Team

40-percent-wide-60-percent-long-spacerEric Berry: What He Brings To The Team

By Frank Leggio & Laddie Morse

 

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After his performance in recent games, I started thinking about the value Eric Berry brings to the defensive backfield and the Kansas City Chiefs overall. As a result, I decided to team up with Laddie Morse to take a look at Berry and see if we can put this into perspective.

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We will be breaking this down into three sections; the numbers, his leadership, and relative comparisons to his player group.  

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THE NUMBERS

First up, let’s start with his performance from Combine to current via a look at the numbers.  

Combine, 2010  Stats

Bench Press – 19 reps, tied for 8th in 2010 (Kevin Ellison 32 reps – 2009)

Vertical Jump – 43 inches, #1 since 2006

40 Yard Dash – 4.47 seconds, tied for 15th since 2006  (TJ Green 4.34 – 2016)

Broad Jump – 130.0 inches, 7th since 2006 (Eric Reid 134.0 inches)

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Looking these over it seems that Berry was one of the overall better performers in the combine. A couple of these could be seen as contributing to his ability to intercept passes (vertical jump and 40-yard dash) and close on the opposition to make tackles (40-yard dash, bench press, and broad jump).

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Career Statistics (Per Pro Football Reference)

 

Eric Berry Through 9 Games
Eric Berry Through 9 Games

 

Pro Football Focus 2016 Season Rankings at Safety

– 8th best safety in the league with a 85.6 Overall Rating

– 5th best coverage safety with a 85.9 rating

– 20th best run defense safety with a 81.1 rating

– 10th most snaps amongst safeties

– 2nd best season (89.6 in 2013 was best)

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I was a little surprised by these stats based on him being higher on the coverage and lower on the run defense within his position group.  I would have thought the other way. His combined stats place him in the Top 10, showing he is fairly well rounded. He is also closing in on his best season record.

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Pro Awards / Honors

  • Four time Pro Bowler (2010, 2012, 2013, 2015)
  • Comeback Player of the Year 2015 (for kicking cancer in 2014)

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Berry has been recognized multiple times (4 of 6 opportunities, with the 2 times he missed being the seasons he tore his ACL and was diagnosed with cancer) as a top player in the league. It is fairly tough to earn this once, so earning it every year (accounting for his injury/illness) is phenomenal.

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Top off the 4 Pro Bowls with being out of football for most of a year fighting cancer to come back and earn one of these trips to Hawaii and you get Comeback Player of the Year. That must have been a no brainer in the voting.

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Historical Rankings- 10 Best Safeties of All Time as rated by Sports CheatSheet

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  1. Ronnie Lott (63 INT, 5 TDs, 17 Fumble Recoveries)
  2. Ken Houston
  3. Paul Krause
  4. Ed Reed
  5. Troy Polamalu
  6. Larry Wilson
  7. Emlen Tunnell
  8. Steve Atwater
  9. Willie Wood
  10. Yale Lary

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Hall of Fame

Jack Christiansen

Ken Houston

Paul Krause

Yale Lary

Ronnie Lott

Mel Renfro

Emlen Tunnel

Aeneas Williams

Larry Wilson

Willie Wood

Rod Woodson

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With the Top 10 shown in green and the Hall of Fame shown in blue, we can see the recorded stats on this group, as compared to Berry. The stats in grey were not captured for these players. I have also added a line for Berry that shows what his stats would extrapolate to, if he plays the average number of games of the group.

 

Career Stats for Top Safeties
Career Stats for Top Safeties

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A quick look shows Berry would have more tackles than Troy Polamalu, Ed Reed, and Aeneas Williams.  He would have more sacks than everyone except Rod Woodson (who played 60 more games) and Troy Polamalu (tied, but Troy played fewer games). Passes Defensed is less than Ed Reed and tied with Polamalu (again, fewer games), but way more than Aeneas Williams and Rod Woodson (even with them having way more games).

 

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Where Berry falls short is in the turnover department. At his current pace, he isn’t in the same league for number of INTs or FRs, but he has done a lot more than most with the ones he did get.  He has returned 1 of every 3 INTs for a touchdown, compared with 1 of every 11-13. He also gains a lot more yards per INT than the rest of the group, 26.5 vs about 16, and FR, 12 vs 6.5.

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So, while Eric Berry is in the upper echelon of the safeties in the league (probably since it began), he still isn’t quite Top 10 or HOF level yet.  If he puts together several more seasons on par or better than his best season to date, then maybe he will be.  

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Leadership

Combine Viewpoint

Strengths

“Berry has a supreme blend of strength and athleticism for a defensive back. One of college football’s most productive players during the last three seasons. Is a very smart defender who displays outstanding instincts. Has a tremendous range when playing the run or pass. Very aggressive coming up in run support. Has the leadership qualities to mold into a future team captain.”

Weaknesses

“Not many areas of concern with Berry. Front offices must check shoulder surgery. Only possesses average size for a safety at the next level but plays bigger than his listed measurables.”

Team Viewpoint

“He was a possessed man,” Marcus Peters said. “He wasn’t gonna stop. He was gonna score, one way or another.” on Eric Berry coming out of half time in the Carolina Panthers game.

“He kind of lives by ‘If you want some, come get some,'” coach Andy Reid said. “I mean, that’s what he lives by; that’s how he handles practice. He’s out there every day. He doesn’t miss practice; he doesn’t miss workouts. He’s going to challenge every play. That’s his mode. He doesn’t care if it’s practice; he doesn’t care if it’s a game. That’s what he does and guys like that. I think, in a simple package, that’s what he’s all about.” – Interview in 2013

“I hate saying you expect that from him, but he just wills himself like no other,” coach Andy Reid said. “You saw that when he defeated cancer; you saw it here.

“That’s just his mentality. It’s unbelievable.” after the Carolina Panthers game.

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As A Mentor

“I just told him to be smart,” Berry said after the game. “That was a big play that we made. It was a great play, so clutch, so on time. The punt, luckily it was five yards. It could’ve been 15 yards. It could’ve put us in a bad situation. I want to get him to think further in the moment. I want him to think about the consequences of what happens after that. He did a great job of getting the ball. I was so glad it was a five-yard penalty and not a 15-yard penalty because that could have shifted the game even more. We always talk about accountability. It’s not about yourself. He says that to me all the time. We’re out there for each other. Sometimes you have to put yourself to the side and do it for your teammate.”

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As I read through those quotes, I could see how Eric Berry inspires confidence in his teammates and coaches. He sets an example for the highest level of play and, when he doesn’t see it, he takes it upon himself to lead by example and peer coach his teammates.

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Players like this become the secret sauce in a championship run. They make the impossible possible. The two games where the Chiefs came back from 17+ point deficits reminded me of the team across the parking lot during their 2015 championship run. Several times they seemed to be down and in an impossible situation only to pull out the victory. In post game interviews you would hear how one player or another did something to fire up the team and start chipping away with the small ball game. Let’s hope Berry and some of the other team leaders are ready if we make it to the playoffs.

~Frank Leggio

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~ ~ ~

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When Frank approached me about teaming up to write a piece on Eric Berry I was thrilled. The last time I teamed up with another writer was to debate Stacy Smith, Reach, on the subject of whether or not the Chiefs new ILB Nico Johnson was a good choice. While I might concede that Stacy won that debate… I won the argument… and the Chiefs lost out in the long run. Hopefully, between Frank and myself, we can say what needs to be said about one of the Chiefs best Safeties ever, Mr. Eric Berry.

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Eric Berry’s Weaknesses

Let’s begin with Eric Berry’s weaknesses. This is a short list and really the only weakness he has is, covering taller WRs and TEs. Many will cite his work against Antonio Gates as an example as the glaring hole in his game but the reality is, no one does well when covering the future Hall of Famer Gates. There are times that the Chiefs other Safety stays in coverage while Berry trolls like an extra linebacker.

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Eric Berry’s Strengths

While you might think Eric Berry’s skill set begins and ends with his ability to stop the run, I’d say his football proficiency begins with his intuition. You can scan back over one game after another and read storylines like: “Berry sniffs out the play,” or “Berry blows up the runner in the backfield” or “BE gets there before the ball carrier.” Sometimes his ability to read a play is just plain spooky, as if he’d memorized the other team’s gameplan or had a headset connected to the other team’s OC.

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No one can deny Berry’s athletic prowess. There are times he’s able to get small and squeeze through a hole between linemen then make a play. ILB Derrick has this ability but Berry often seems to make his play at the opportune moment.

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Eric Berry is equally skilled as a tackler as he is a big hitter.  

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Comparing Berry to Other Chiefs Safeties

When you look at the overall contributions of the Safeties that John Dorsey has brought in like Quintin Demps, Kurt Coleman, Tyvon Branch, Husain Abdullah as well as the long-term deal he gave Ron Parker you’d be hard pressed to say the Chiefs fear they won’t be able to find a “good enough” replacement. Why would they want to pay Berry more than twice the amount they are paying Ron Parker? It’s hard to justify, even with all the upside of Berry’s character and inspiration. Of course, all bets are off if Berry has a pick-6 to win the Super Bowl. In that case, how do you not pay Eric Berry?

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Comparing Berry to other Chiefs Players

This next offseason John Dorsey has some hard decisions to make: does he find a way to keep both Eric Berry and Dontari Poe? The Chiefs philosophy appears to be “build up front” first and foremost and fill in around that. In that case, Berry appears to perhaps be the odd man out. However, many think that Dorsey drafted DL Chris Jones to be Dontari Poe’s replacement in the event that Poe wanted to max out a contract because handing out Max deals to any player is not what Dorsey seems to be about.

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In the long run, it appears that Dorsey has hedged his bets with Jones and gives him a bit of leverage in the Poe negotiations.

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Reeling in Both Poe and Berry

It would seem obvious that the Chiefs would like to keep both Poe and Berry but even if they could do that, it may be unlikely that they do since it would tie up too many dollars in those two spots. My prediction is that even though Eric Berry is a transcendent player, he’s the odd man out.

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The 2017 Draft

Recently, Connor Rogers wrote a post for fanragsports.com called, “2017 NFL Draft is loaded with

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Playmaking Safeties” in which he said,

 

“There has been a drought in recent years for NFL franchises trying to find playmaking safeties through the draft. The last great class was in 2010, which included Eric Berry, Earl Thomas, Devin McCourty, T.J. Ward and Kam Chancellor (not a bad haul for the Seahawks). While over half a decade has passed, it’s looking like the 2017 class could be a great year to add help on the back end.”

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Connor Rogers lists five safeties to focus on: Jamal Adams out of LSU, Jabrill Peppers from Michigan, Malik Hooker of Ohio State, Justin Evans- Texas A&M and Budda Baker at Washington State. I’m familiar with all of them and although Baker is the only one without the ideal size to be a playmaking safety, you would be wrong about him to assume he won’t be very good in the NFL as one publication compares him to the Honey Badger, Tyrann Mathieu.

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Knowing what we know about all the different safeties that John Dorsey has brought in so far, it should take no one by surprise to see the Chiefs take a safety in the first two rounds of the upcoming draft, especially if he can project one of these five outstanding safety prospects to one of his picks.

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Post-Win in Denver

Someone commented that Eric Berry willed the Chiefs to victory in Denver. His show of big hit pure consistency of hitting may draw him a penalty or two from the league but he clearly set a tone by making players pay when they crossed the middle of the Chiefs defense. While I’ve stated above that Berry may be the odd man out, it’s difficult to think about Eric Berry wearing another team’s uniform at any time in the future. However, Tony Gonzalez was last seen wearing a Falcon on his helmet and if a future hall of famer can do it… I guess Berry can too. In any event, it will be painful if it happens.

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Let us know what you think Chiefs fans.

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Frank Leggio
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Frank Leggio

Frank Leggio is an operations director living in the Columbus, OH area.He has two sons and a couple of Beagles.He was born in Germany, went to high school in KS and college in CO.
Frank Leggio
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  • berttheclock

    As to how well he covered Antonio Gates, may I suggest he played several games against him when he was not a full strength. He had been taken out by a cheap and dirty shot by the former wide out of the Bills and it took him a long time before he was able to regain his needed strength. He played many games on just pure guts. BTW, he got a bit of revenge against that wide out in the Bolts’ game of last season, when, he went through the legs of King Dunlap and smashed into the Bills transfer and leveled him for a loss. That brought out a fire from the rest of the team and this is one of the things no one can really put down with just stats and that is how he inspires the rest of the Chiefs’ defense.

    • berttheclock

      Perhaps, there is a bit of Karma to this story as Stevie Johnson has been lost for the 2016 season due to a torn meniscus.

      • ladner morse

        Karma Sharma… I think there is some of that “Karma” in the smaller things in life but the big payoff Karma usually never happens… or so it seems.

    • ladner morse

      That “inspiration” component is something that can not be measured. Berry is what you can a legend in his own time and although he’s not “best” S in the league stat-wise, I’d likely be wrong to say he’s not the best Safety of this era… since both Reed and Polamalu walked away from the game. Time will tell on that one but I do hope Dorsey does everything he can do to keep him. If… Poe is not able to return to full strength, signing him to a huge deal is off the table and Berry becomes a priority.

      • mnelson52

        And what if Poe does return to full strength?

        • freshmeat62

          Back injuries at his weight? I wouldn’t bet on it! And that is exactly what the Chiefs would be doing.

          • berttheclock

            I did not have a great deal of weight in my thirties, but, I had to give up playing pickup BBall and league BBall (both of which I loved) because of back injuries. What really got to me is I had to spend one solid year swimming in the LA Athletic Club pool which was just across from the BBall court. My doctor said I would never play BBall again. To prove him wrong, after one year, I suited up and played one game, then, hung it up.

          • mnelson52

            I agree, but my understanding was that he was having spasms, so it would depend on what’s causing them. Also, people that get cancer free often have it come back later. ( I pray it doesn’t ). The fact remains the that they’re gambling on his health also.

  • berttheclock

    Great list of HOFers who played safety. But, may I add one player to the list. No, for whatever reason he never made the Hall, but, he was honored by both Pro Football Reference and the committee for naming the AFL Hall of Fame for being making the All 1960s Team and the All 1960s First Team. He is Johnny Robinson, who came to the Dallas Texans in 1960 as a RB, who caught passes out of the backfield and returned kicks. He did this for 3 seasons, but, when the Texans came to KC, Stram switched him to safety. Over the next 8 years, Robinson amassed 57 INTs for 741 yards and one TD, recovered 10 fumbles and returned 6 of them for 81 yards and one TD. In playoff games, he had 4 INTS.

    He still remains my personal standard of excellence for any safety of the Chiefs to emulate. Berry has come the closest.

    Of course, there was Sabby Piscitelli, but, that is a far different story.

    • berttheclock

      BTW, in 1970 at the age of 32, Johnny Robinson had 10 INTs.

      • Calchiefsfan

        Johnny Robinson, one of my favorite players. A genuinely nice person. He came into the Sears shoe department at Metcalf South when I was working there during my high school years, 1968. I sold his lovely daughter a pair of shoes and we talked Chiefs football for 20 minutes. I was thrilled. He was so gracious to take the time to talk to this young kid.

    • ladner morse

      Sabby, Sabby, Sabby……….. how could any of us forget Sabby.

      • berttheclock

        Can you believe he, actually, was a 2nd round pick when he left Oregon State?

        • ladner morse

          no

    • Frank Leggio

      Those stats are pretty good too.

      Yes, Sabby Piscitelli, I think he is now wearing #12 for the Chiefs. He was the defensive Albert Wilson for a while.

  • berttheclock

    Meanwhile, for news concerning the Chiefs, Atlanta just lost their best pass rusher and run defender, Adrian Clayborn, DE, who is going to be out for at least a month with a torn MCL.

    • freshmeat62

      One of these days, the Chiefs offense is going to get their act together, and play the way we expect. This would be a good time to start.

    • berttheclock

      BTW, Clayborn had been running stunts on the right side along with Dwight Feeney.

    • mnelson52

      I hate injuries for anyone and would rather beat teams at their strongest, as we did the Broncos. That being said, as many injuries as we have, I would be happy with any little advantage we can get. Hope he has a quick recovery.

  • ladner morse

    ❄️❄️❄️ https://t.co/Gt3YZlZDT8— Dansby Swanson (@LieutenantDans7) November 27, 2016

  • berttheclock

    As to the Chiefs taking Jabrill Peppers, he would be great as Harbaugh uses him a great deal as LB. He is a thumper. But, he will go far too high in the draft. However, there is a Michigan DB I would love to see Dorsey check out even though he is rehabbing from a torn ACL at the moment. He is the six four, Jeremy Clark, who has played outside and nickle very well. Injured against Penn State in the upper third of the season, he may not be able to get a hardship six year as he has already red shirted before. So, if healthy, he will come out for the draft and, if healthy, would add great size at corner.

    • ladner morse

      Peppers and Adams are probably the only two from this class who could do and admirable job replacing Berry. Both will be gone before the Chiefs pick at #32.

      See what I did there? 🙂

      • berttheclock

        See, ever since you went back and reprised Frankie’s “High Hopes”, your eternal optimism machine kicked into high gear.

        • ladner morse

          Oops truer goes another rubber tree plant.

          Amazing what used to pass for a popular song back then. She wore an its-bitsy-teeny-weeny yellow…… beep-beep, her horn went beep-beep-beep……. a one-eyed-one-horned flying purple people eater………

          • larry mckinney

            Who put the bomp in the……

          • berttheclock

            Hard to find the “classics” anymore such as my favorite Christmas song played. “The Tailors Song” It goes, “I got a brand new pair of pants for Christmas and the zipper would not zip, so, I said to the tailor, “let it show, let it show, let it show”.

            That was from Woodie Woodberry, who was a lounge lizard for many years in the fifties.

          • larry mckinney

            Berttheclock – a man for all seasons.

    • berttheclock

      I wouldn’t even mind Dorsey looking closely at Jake Butts, the Michigan TE.

      • ladner morse

        I did can get one more good year out of DJ & Hali and add a couple of playmakers in the 17 Draft, next season could be terrific.

        • ladner morse

          “If Reid”………

          dang spell check!!!!!!

        • larry mckinney

          Dorsey has my confidence. Wildly unreasoning, unquestioned fan of his. With Dorsey, we’ll go long.

        • berttheclock

          For some reason, I have not been able to find where Dorsey has sent an accredited scout to Michigan games. He didn’t for last week’s game against Ohio State. I’m sure they are scouting the players from both teams. But, he did sent an accredited scout to last week’s Miami-Duke game. Trent Baalke, the Niners’ current GM was there supposedly to check out the Miami QB.

        • berttheclock

          BTW, have you checked out the snap counts for last Sunday’s game. Perez has both the offense and defense up at the Star. Interesting that Hali played every defensive snap with Houston just behind him. Poe was only in for a few before leaving the game, yet, received a very good PFF rating.

          But, think about Hali playing every single defensive snap with a bone on bone knee.

          • mnelson52

            I hope Ford gets back soon. I don’t know that Hali could continue to do that. I would like to see Hali continue to get limited snaps so he can stay strong through the rest of the season.

          • berttheclock

            I just read over at the Star that Dadi was listed as inactive last week, yet, his name was not up on the inactive list.

          • freshmeat62

            If his knee is that bad, I don’t know how he does it either. I have ‘arthur’ (that’s what my mom called it) in my knee also. Until I got a cortisone shot, and that took almost 3 weeks to work, I could barely walk. The pain was terrible.

        • freshmeat62

          DJ, maybe, but I think Hali is done. I’m expecting ‘terrific’ things from this next draft also, because, if I’m not mistaken, the Chiefs should be getting some comps this year. And since those are now tradeable (spellcheck says that’s not a word…eeeh), I expect Dorsey to wheel-and-deal. But I think this is the year they have to find their QBOTF. I’ve been in Smiths corner from the beginning. Defending him because he had no talent around him to show what he can do. This year I believe he does, and he’s just not producing. I’ve got more to say about that for a separate comment.

          • Laurels and limitations

            Man, a lot of the impetus for the team’s inspired play has to be that Hali is getting long in the football tooth. Hali being inside Arrowhead is the same as the hallowed halls themselves to this younger cast, but yeah, I think this is his last year.

      • ladner morse

        Did you just suggest that Dorsey look at Butts?

        • berttheclock

          I don’t know if Dorsey would send the team proctologist to Michigan……………

          However, Dorsey likes to use due diligence.

  • freshmeat62

    If Berry can stay healthy another 4-5 years, and continue to play the way he is this year, he should be a lock for the HOF. He’s had games in previous years where he’s had big hits, but this year it’s like he’s on a mission to destroy anybody w/ the ball. Unfortunately interception seems to be the biggest stat people look at for safeties, and he won’t be real high in that area, but his overall game is HOF quality.

    As for who will be kept between him and Poe, this is hard for me to say because I’ve been a Poe fan ever since half way thru his rookie season, but Berry would be my pick. Poe is getting to be injury prone, and w/ the depth of good young d-linemen Dorsey has brought in, I’d have to go w/ Berry. W/ DJ and Hali getting toward the end of their careers, the Chiefs need that fire that Berry brings.

    • mnelson52

      There is still no one on the team that can keep fighting double teams for 90% of the snaps like Poe. I’ve never seen anyone at 350 pounds with his speed, athleticism, and stamina. If it’s true it all starts up front, then I would have to go with Poe over Berry. As mentioned, there are some very good safeties in the upcoming draft, but no 350 pound NTs with great athleticism. I like Jones and think he will be good, but I don’t think he will ever be able to fight double teams for 90% of the snaps. A weaker front will make it harder on everyone behind them. I know our depth is pretty good with defensive linemen, and looked good Sunday night, but also all of us have been talking all year about how weak Denver’s O-line is. Our guys still had to be good to do what they did, but none compare to Poe.
      ( by the way I was against drafting him but glad to be wrong )

      • berttheclock

        Yes, as I was in the DeCastro camp, but, Romeo knew what he was doing and, for once, Pioli listened to him.

        • mnelson52

          I was also screaming for DeCastro and he’s doing a good job protecting Big Ben. Still wish we had him, but you are right, Pioli got that one right.

      • freshmeat62

        I too was against drafting him, but like I said, about half way thru his rookie season I changed my mind on him. I agree he’s awesome when playing, but his injuries are becoming more common, and I just worry that he can keep that 350# body. Also I believe Berry will be less costly to the cap. Maybe!

      • berttheclock

        BTW, Atlanta has a much lighter NT in Grady Jarrett. I wanted Dorsey to draft him in order to spell Poe on occasion. Dorsey had no chance as Jarrett went a bit higher than our pick in the 5th round. I saw one play this year where Jarret made a sack on a delayed move.

    • Frank Leggio

      One thing in most stats is that they cant always capture plays that impact a game. Meaning how many first downs or TDs has Berry stopped on his own? How many players has he covered where they didnt wven attempt to throw to them? (Like what MP22 is experiencing now. Tough to get an INT when the ball is being thrown 30 yards away.). What about his on the field defensive calls? And, as we wrote above, what about the way his leadership helps make the whole team better? I think we see a lot of this last point in him and DJ from the defense.

  • berttheclock

    The Broncos and their fans ooze such class. When, Norwood, the onetime PS player for Andy Reid in Philly, returned a punt for 62 yards in the SB allowing the Donkies to kick a FG to be up 13-7, Norwood was a hero. But, after fumbling against the Chiefs, Talib shoved him and fans have screaming for Horseface to cut him.

    • berttheclock

      Norwood has been listed on the depth chart as behind Cody Latimer, the former Indiana wide out. Latimer was selected in the slot SF had from the Alex Smith trade and they traded it onward to Denver.

    • Laurels and limitations

      Neither the Denver players, nor their fans are built for the tough haul. That entire organization is an example of what happens when things go right, and when things go wrong. Even when KC was at it’s lowest, and there have been many, I cannot remember the team turning on itself..especially during a game.

  • Merlin

    My prediction is that the Chiefs will keep Berry over Poe. Poe has been too injured last season and this season while Berry is the heart and soul of the Defense

    • Chiefly Bacon

      On the flip side, Poe’s injuries could bring the price down. Would you rather have Poe at 8m per or Berry at 11m per. Tough choice.

      • Merlin

        Good point. I would sign Berry to the best deal I could, then worry about Poe and the rest. Taking Berry away is ripping the heart out of the defense. If that means I lose Poe, I lose Poe

        • Laurels and limitations

          plus, KC’s defense is built for life without Poe, that’s not so with Berry at this point. Seeing as how KC is in salary cap purgatory next year, even though there are ALWAYS options, re-signing Poe, and going FA impact Safety seems silly. Pay Berry, then let the depth move up on the D-line. That seems a lot more feasible to me.

  • berttheclock

    During Sunday’s game thread, some poster mentioned the strong leg of Riley Dixon, the Broncos punter. Of course, he was the same punter who kicked the ball to Hill, but……….. However, heading in the draft, Elway was not happy with paying Colquitt, so, he drafted Dixon in the 7th round. Dixon had been a top rated college punter at Syracuse. He ended up beating out Colquitt. I would imagine at some point Dorsey is going to have to address replacing Colquitt’s brother who happens to be a better puner than Britt. But, look at the stats for Dixon, yes, he is able to punt in the rarified air at Mile High for several games, but, he has been able to ladn 20 kicks inside the 20.

    • berttheclock

      By being a 7th round pick, his salary is only a 4 year $2.42 M deal with an $80,009 signing bonus.

    • tm1946

      Their Colquitt had to big a salary to keep. Our Colquitt is getting paid a lot, yes he deserves it BUT a punter at half the price might leave something for a _____ , just saying.

      • berttheclock

        King with the Raiders is one of the best punters in the game. But, he was a walk on with them when they sill had Lechler. They came up with a sort of “injured pinky” which placed him on IR, but, allowed both Lechler and a top assistant coach teach him more about direction kicks. So, the next season, Lechler jumped to the Texans and the Raiders had a far lower paid quality punter who, also, excels in dropping punts inside of the 20.

        • tm1946

          Smack, what I am talking about in money management and Dorsey. When you add Dorsey seems to use early draft to be potential replacements for contact due players….. and I do not love the guy.

          I know, he great and only a hater would doubt Dorsey….. guess if the shoe fits….like I care.

  • freshmeat62

    Yesterday Jason Seibel stated “it was probably the best-coached game head coach Andy Reid has put together since arriving in Kansas City”. When I read that I thought ‘humm, ok’. I stewed on that all day (I do have to get a life). Anyway, I don’t think so. Maybe the 2nd half he got better, but thinking back I was doing a lot of yelling during that game about some of the plays being called. Denver has one of the best, if not the best pass rush in the league. I was seeing these pass plays being called where the receivers where hauling butt down field, plays that were having to take way to long to be completed w/ the type of rush Denver was doing. Now I like going downfield as much as the next guy, but it seemed to me that the Chiefs should be developing the quick hitters first to keep those LB’s from charging.

    • berttheclock

      Plus, Collinsworthless said on such as 3rd and 9, the Donkies’ defenders were setting up six to seven yards behind the LOS knowing Reid would not try to have Alex throw longer. Even if the pass had been caught, the Donkies would have stopped the receiver at the point of the catch.

      • mnelson52

        I don’t like Collinsworthless, but I have to agree with him on this one.

      • freshmeat62

        I’m not a big fan of Collinsworth either, but I can stomach him a lot better than I could Dan Dierdorf. That sanctimonious, holier than thou, hypocrite played next to one one of the dirtiest players to play the game, Conrad Dobler. I never ever heard him say anything bad about Dobler. In fact he used to laugh when talking about some of his plays.

        • tm1946

          Gosh but I loved Dobler and his play on the field. He always maintained other players kept putting their body parts in his mouth. You do what you gotta do.

          • berttheclock

            Speaking of players with dirty reps, I did not want Dorsey to sign Incognito, but, he has cleaned up his act and has become a major road grader and pass protector for the Bills. Plus, the Bills signed him for a song.

          • mnelson52

            I agree he’s good but I would not want him in our locker room

          • freshmeat62

            I always thought Incognito was pretty good. When all that bullying (can’t remember the guy he was bullying) happened, I figured that hazing and calling players out was probably part of the locker room of any pro team. I just thought that maybe the other guy was a little bit weak. What Martellus Bennett in that ’30 for 30′ piece I saw last nite called ‘bitches’.

          • berttheclock

            It was the large OT from Stanford, who never really wanted to play football in the first place. He is out of the league. Tried to continue with the Niners, but, lacked any intensity.

          • freshmeat62

            I learned a long time ago that skin is thin, and if you don’t want that thin skin to blister, you had better develop some deep callus.

          • tm1946

            One of the “gee, I wished” I agree wish. Incognito was no choir boy but got a lot of PC bad press. Frankly would have been better money spent over our current RT.

        • mnelson52

          And Dobler was known as the dirtiest man in football.

          • mnelson52

            I loved his play

    • tm1946

      Reid is what he has been since getting off the plane in KC. Only issue for me was his apparent merriment after Sundays game. In the presser he could hardly keep from laughing. Very full of his genius……he forgot the first 49 minutes of crap basking in the glory of the last 9.

      PS Sundays win just reinforces how great his genius is….expect more of same, it seems to work.

      • larry mckinney

        Wow! So Reid being really upbeat after a huge road win is an issue for you? Cannot begin to understand your position. HIS TEAM WON THE GAME!!!

    • Frank Leggio

      I agree. I did think that not trying to pickup a 3rd and 20 with a long play was a good idea early. Denver defense would have made us pay, so rely on the KC D then. But a throw back across the field to Wilson? Actually any play to Wilson. Where were the early passes to Hill and Conley? I didnt think the rush plays were particularly creative. -althofh, to be fair maybe it was expected that basic plays would work against that d.

      • mnelson52

        The run against Denver worked for every team but the Chiefs. That being said, WOW what a game. No way were we supposed to beat a healthy well rested Denver team on the road with a lot of backups.If I had been Kubiack, at home, with that defense, where the thin air helps, I would have gone for the win also. Glad he missed. He had the distance even after kicking the ground first.

      • Andy is stuck on stupid with Wilson.

  • tm1946

    Pay – Berry or Poe or both. Please, this is not – I like this or not. MONEY MANAGEMENT, we need 53 players to compete a full season. We may be suffering right now with to much cash alloted to few stars.

    That said, we probably ruined Poe over playing him, he moves on. Berry, if reasonable, welcome to finish your career, if not, been fun. Now aren’t you glad I am not GM?

  • Chiefs-Kings-A’s

    I’ve rewatched (semi-fast forward) Sundays game a couple of times and just noticed, when Smith connected with Hill on 4th and 10 in the final seconds of regulation for the first down….TJ Ward (untouched) headed straight for Smith, Smith knew he was going to take a nasty hit but, stood his ground regardless.

    • Merlin

      Good point. Alex really hung in there. That is a trait you see in winning QB’s, the willingness to hang in there and take a hit at a key moment.

    • sidibeke

      And put the ball exactly where it had to be. It was a big time throw.

    • ladner morse

      That was a… “Season is on the line”… moment, and Smith came through.

  • sidibeke

    Funny you wrote this, because I’ve been thinking about Berry since the Den game. I love him as a thumper (run support), but my thought is that he lacks the speed to play single high. I know Gaines had a bad game, but he had no help from EB. I think we need to find a faster S to play that single high, maybe in the draft next year if Murray isn’t that guy.

    • Laurels and limitations

      fair point

  • sidibeke

    Line has moved from KC being 3.5 to 4 pt dogs. Money going on Atl. KC plays better as a dog. 🙂

  • Frank Leggio

    If winning when your team has a 1.9% chance at some point late in the game sounds familiar, this might be why.

  • Frank Leggio

    If winning when you have a 1.9% chance sounds familiar, this might be why.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/02c4bc3b9be3367468ea2d73cad633929201e1c980b98b2454183f9879b93b01.png